Loading...
Blog 2018-06-07T17:05:26+00:00

Is a Major Renovation Worth the Time or Should I Just Move?

When people decide it’s time to renovate their homes, they usually come to us for one of two reasons:

● They’ve just purchased a lot or an existing home and want to design and build a new house.
● They’ve lived in their home for years, love where they are, and want to make substantial changes to make their space even better.

The first is the easiest. Your design ideas are more open and able to be applied to a new design or may be solidly in place. You might […]

4 Reasons You Should Value The Relationship With Your Architect

Building something from the ground up can be a time-consuming and at times, overwhelming process. But it doesn’t have to be. Working with the best architects can make the building experience a rewarding and meaningful one.

Rhodes Architecture + Light has more than two decades of experience building in the Pacific Northwest. We can make your vision a reality. There are many reasons you should value the relationship with your Architect. But here are just a few of the reasons partnering with Rhodes for your design project can be a […]

The Sustainable House

Sustainability Begins With Design

Part I

“Building Green” is often touted in architectural magazines and online articles as an important consideration for the eco-conscious consumer when planning a new house. Once you get beyond the glossy imagery showing beautiful houses with locally sourced materials and green roofs, you may be left asking yourself “what makes a house design truly sustainable and  what are the benefits of designing and building in this manner for the environment, my family and my pocketbook”?

When executed successfully, a sustainable house will result in overall energy savings, improved […]

The Smaller House, Part III

How You Can Have More in Less

Part III

Creating thoughtful, efficient, comfortable smaller space is a process. An example from our practice is the best way to illustrate the ideas and thought that can go into creating smaller homes.

We were approached by a discerning builder and his family to design a river-front cabin for four families in limited space. The building we designed has common living areas, bathrooms (some compartmentalized with separate shower/toilet rooms and common vanities with multiple sinks) a shared kitchen with multiple preparation areas and work areas, a […]

The Smaller House, Part II

Small Houses Big Spaces

Part II

Tiny houses are not small and small houses are not tiny. The tiny house movement, while illustrating a sought-after trend toward living with less encompasses single spaces in which all functions are combined. Living, dining, cooking, working at home happen together, usually in one largely undifferentiated room. All or most of the tiny house shares the same space and the same scale.

Smaller houses do not mean the creation of one room in which different functions are combined, sharing the same room dimensions, ceiling heights, views or […]

The Smaller House

How You Can Have More in Less

Part I

“Sustainable” is Nonsense and Smaller is “Green”

Your grandparents grew up and raised your parents in a house about a third of the size of yours. They raised a family of four in it. According to the National Association of Homebuilders the average American family of 2.6 persons today lives in at least 2,687 square feet or 1,033 square feet per person. Our grandparents raised larger families in just 983 square feet (245 square feet per family member) and I grew up […]